Taranaki maunga is set to be known solely by its Māori name.

Ngā Iwi o Taranaki and the crown have reached an agreement for Taranaki Maunga to be used exclusively and for Mt Egmont to be scrapped.

Up until 1986, Mt Taranaki was officially recognised by the National Geographic Board as Mt Egmont.

The name was given by James Cook – who sailed past the maunga in 1770 and named it after a supporter, John Perceval the Earl of Egmont.

Since 1986, the maunga has been officially recognised as both Mt Taranaki and Mt Egmont. Now, it will be just Mt Taranaki.

The agreement will also see the Egmont National Park renamed to Te Papakura o Taranaki.

The 3rd December each year marks the International Day of People with Disabilities.

Since 1992, the United Nations have promoted this day each year.

The day is to celebrate the achievements of disabled people around the world as well as to promote the rights of people with disabilities.

Around one billion people around the world experience disability of some form.

The theme for 2019 is: Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership.

This year, the focus is on including disabled people. The pledge is to ‘leave no one behind’.

The aim of the International Day of People with Disabilities is to make people aware of inequalities, as well as celebrating the achievements of people who have disabilities.

Palmerston the Cat lives and works in a UK government office. He has finally returned after taking six months’ stress leave.

The black and white cat was forced to take a break from work after he was overloaded with treats given to him by government employees. 

Palmerston announced his return from his Twitter account on Monday.

“I am happy to announce that I will be returning to my Chief Mouser duties at the @foreignoffice this week!”

But employees will have to follow special ‘Palmerston Protocols’ to avoid a repeat of overindulgence.

Most importantly, no-one other than his carers are allowed to feed Palmerston. 

The best way to deal with cyberbullying is by reporting it or talking about it.

What is cyberbullying?

Online bullying – or cyberbullying – is using technology like shared texts, emails, online posts, images, messages or videos to embarrass, threaten or harm someone. It can range from spreading rumours to encouraging violence. Unlike physical bullies, cyberbullies often choose to hide their identity. They can also bully from a distance and reach lots of people with just a few taps on a keypad, which can be very stressful for their targets.
Like all bullying, it’s not OK. No one has to put up with it and it can be stopped.

What can I do if I’m being cyberbullied at school?

It’s important to remember that – despite using technology – cyberbullying still depends on real people to spread and respond to it, so people are the key to shutting it down.  If you’re being cyberbullied, there are some practical things you (or your caregivers ) can do to stop it:

  • Tell someone what is happening and that you are upset by it – don’t suffer alone.
  • Check out your school’s policy on cyberbullying and see what they can do.
  • If you’d rather not talk to friends, family or school you can always contact  Netsafe , Kidsline, What’s Up, or Youthline for confidential support and advice on what to do or how to cope.
  • Change your phone number, block or unfriend bullies, and alter your online profile or privacy details so they’re more secure; most providers offer help with settings.
  • Collect evidence of the bullying: keep messages, take screen shots or photos, record dates and urls, or print emails.
  • Consider taking a short break from some or all social media; you have the right to be online, but sometimes a rest can help calm both emotional and media storms.
  • Report what’s happened to your internet or mobile provider – they may be able take down or block certain numbers and sites that break their code of conduct.
  • If what’s happening is really serious or scary, consider telling the Police.

What can I do to protect myself online?

  • Choose carefully with whom you share your mobile and online details and any messages or posts: one US study found 17% of all so-called “private” emails/texts were shared – often with more than one person.
  • Set your privacy settings to protect what can be shared on social networks like Facebook, Instagram or Snapchat; organisations like Netsafe and Sticks ‘n Stones also have great advice on how to do this and how to report things like bullying.
  • Never give anyone else your passwords/logins.
  • Don’t retaliate or respond to internet bullies and trolls – they might use it against you or as an excuse to continue; they’ll lose interest if they aren’t getting a response.
  • Never join in cyberbullying – what goes around often comes around.

References


Women and Children’s Health Network, 4 May 2017. “Cyberbullying – Bullying From a Distance”.  Retrieved from: http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetailsKids.aspx?p=335&np=288&id=2704  2 November 2017.
Netsafe, 2 October 2015. “How to Use Privacy Settings on Social Networks”. Retrieved from: https://www.netsafe.org.nz/privacy-settings-on-social-networks/ 2 November 2017.
Netsafe, 23 December 2016. “Online Bullying Help for Young People”. Retrieved from: https://www.netsafe.org.nz/reporting-young-people/ 2 November 2017.
Sticks ‘n Stones, n.d. “Dealing  with Bullying”. http://www.sticksnstones.co.nz/youth/dealing-with-bullying/ 1 November 2017.

Useful  links

Facebook https://www.netsafe.org.nz/adjusting-your-privacy-settings-on-facebook/

Kidsline http://www.kidsline.org.nz/Home_312.aspx

Netsafe https://www.netsafe.org.nz/aboutnetsafe/  

Office of the eSafety[HO8]  Commisioner https://www.esafety.gov.au/complaints-and-reporting/cyberbullying-complaints/social-media-services-safety-centres

Snapchat https://support.snapchat.com/en-US/a/privacy-settings

Sticks ‘n Stones http://www.sticksnstones.co.nz/our-project/

Twitter https://support.twitter.com/articles/20169886

What’s Up? http://www.whatsup.co.nz/

Youthline https://www.youthline.co.nz/contact-us/

Upstander versus Bystander , Life Education Factsheet.